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Equestrian tours in Canada, Alberta
Banff  - Wilderness Tenting Ride


What to Bring for Banff - Wilderness Tenting Ride


Below is a list of items you NEED to bring with you. We have had many years of personal experience dealing with Mother Nature up here, so please take our list to heart.

Average Temperatures

 Month/ High/ Low
June 19C / 66F 5C / 41F
July 22C / 71F 7C / 45F
August 22C / 70F 7C / 44F
September 16C / 60F 3C / 38F

These are average temperatures at an elevation of 4,538 feet. Temperatures will drop at higher elevations.

When packing your gear, keep in mind it is being packed out on a mule and our animal’s comfort is very important to us. By following these guidelines you can help us ensure that we’re taking care of all our animals.

What to pack your gear into
You must pack your gear in soft-sided, cloth or nylon bag. It can not have any hard edges, frames or wheels. Your gear is restricted to a total maximum weight of 30 lbs (sleeping bag and your luggage). If you do not have a water-resistant bag, it is a good idea to line the inside with garbage bags in the event of rain. You may pack your sleeping bag separately from your other gear. Saddlebags, rain gear and other essentials that you will need during the day (camera, sunscreen, bug spray, lip balm, extra sweater, water bottle, etc) that you are taking on your horse with you are not included in the 30lb weight restriction.

Daypacks, backpacks or other bags are not allowed, but your rain gear will travel with you on the horse and your guide will help you attach it to the saddle. If you would like to bring saddlebags please fill them with only those essential items that you would need during the day. Fanny packs (a small pack that ties around the waist) also work well. We have a limited supply of saddlebags available free of charge which are available for pick up upon check-in (sorry, no earlier).

The length of your trip will alter what you need to bring. This list is ideal for a 6 day trip.

Essential Items
1. Bags/luggage – Waterproof bags are the best option. Drysacks, favoured by canoers, or a gym bag lined with garbage bags work well.
2. A warm sleeping bag — We recommend a bag rated to -15 degrees Celsius or 5 degrees Fahrenheit. You may not need it, but it sure comes in handy if you do. A favourite  cowboy trick for extra warmth is to tuck a flannel sheet or non-bulky blanket inside your sleeping bag.
3. A warm coat — Essential to ward off chilly nights or a windy day. Also bring a heavy sweater (wool is a great insulator) or fleece jacket.
4. Rain gear — A rain coat and rain pants, and if possible, coverings for your boots and hat. Please DO NOT bring rain ponchos, they flap in the wind and can scare the horses. If you have one, we recommend a slicker. We have a limited supply of full-length slickers (traditional cowboy rain coat) available. These are available for pick up upon check in based on a first come first served basis. Clothing that is easily layered works the best. You can always remove what you don’t need, but you still have it just in case. Also, bring your most comfortable gear — this is not the time to break-in new boots or a new hat.
5. Shirts – long sleeve and t-shirts to your preference and length of trip.
6. Jeans – a cowboy classic. Also important is a pair of long underwear for chilly nights.
7. Riding boots — A boot with a heel that can easily slip in and out of stirrups. Alternatives would be a narrow style of hiking boot or solid sneaker. For safety reasons, clunky hiking boots are not recommended. Water (rain) resistant boots are recommended.
 — or an extra pair of shoes for wearing around camp, an extra pair of DRY socks is also recommended.
9. Toiletries — towel, facecloth, biodegradable shampoo, toothbrush, toothpaste, disposable razors, etc. Please note that we do not have any electricity at the camps. WE SUPPLY TOILET PAPER AND HAND SOAP AT ALL CAMPS.
10. Hat — A cowboy hat offers the most protection from the elements. Baseball caps or canvas-type hats are also fine. Please ensure that your hat fits snug or ties on and will not blow off in the wind. Chin straps are recommended. If you prefer to wear a riding helmet, we have them available upon check in on a first come first served basis.
11. Gloves — Lined leather or suede gloves provide protection from the elements and a sure grip on the reins (bring two pair just in case one gets wet).
12. Scarf — A silk or cotton scarf is recommended for extra warmth.
13. Sunscreen— sunglasses and mosquito repellent.
14. Your camera – extra batteries.
15. Flashlight — Remember to check your batteries!
16. Liquor – Our camps are licensed and offer a small selection of beer and wine for sale
17. Cellular phones do not work in the areas you’ll be riding in so leave them somewhere safe. If you will be using the camera on your phone, please note there is no charging station in the backcountry.
18. Water bottle – for refreshment while you are riding. You will be able to refill your water bottle at each camp.
19. Saddlebags – You are welcome to bring your own; We do have saddlebags available at check in. Please fill them with only those essential items that you would need during the day, such as lip balm, your camera, sunscreen, etc. We reserve the right to limit the amount of gear in the saddlebags for weight. Daypacks, backpacks or other bags are NOT allowed — they are hard on your back and hard on the horse’s back, and do not tie properly to the saddle.
20. Cash – you may want to bring some cash to purchase liquor or leave a gratuity for your cooks. You can also use credit cards to purchase liquor.

How To Make Bed Roll
Lay out your canvas tarp on the ground. Lay your thermos in the middle of the tarp with the air valve pointing to the top of the bedroll (open the valve so that the air will escape as you roll). Line your sleeping bag with a flannel sheet or extra blanket. Place your closed sleeping bag in the middle of the tarp, on top of the thermos. Put a pillowcase in the middle of your sleeping bag. (Once you are ready for bed, you can use your warm coat inside the pillowcase as a pillow). Fold one side flap of the tarp over the sleeping bag. Fold in the other side of the tarp over the sleeping bag. Fold the bottom flap over and start rolling towards the top of the sleeping bag. Once you are near the head of the sleeping bag, reach in and close the valve on your thermos pad. Fold in the top flap of canvas tarp and finish rolling. Using a rope with a slipknot, tie the bedroll securely.

Equipment Rental
Equipment Rental email Bactrax/Snowtips at http://www.snowtips-bactrax.com/, for information regarding sleeping bags/liners, luggage bags etc. Located at 225 Bear Street, Snowtips offers a convenient rental service. They are open from 8am until 8pm, and would love to receive your inquiries. If you would prefer to contact them by telephone, they can be reached at (403) 762-8177.
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Banff - Wilderness Tenting Ride
Tour Code: RTAB11
3 days / 2 nights ~$830.00
Dates : June to Sept

Trip Rating :
Difficulty : Riding Level
Riding Level Explained
ABeginner
Beginner A rider who has limited experience, is unable to post the trot and does not canter.
BNovice
Novice A rider who is capable of mounting and dismounting unassisted, capable of applying basic aids, comfortable and in control at the walk, moderate length posting trots, and short canters.
CIntermediate
Intermediate A rider who has a firm seat, is confident and in control at all paces (including posting trots, two point canters and gallops), but does not ride regularly.
D Strong Intermediate
Strong Intermediate An intermediate rider who is currently riding regularly and is comfortable in the saddle for at least 6 hours per day.
EAdvanced
All of the above, plus an independent seat, soft hands, and capable of handlinga spirited horse in open country.
Lodging: Standard
Lodging Level Explained
   
= Facilities in lodges, estancias, haciendas, resorts, etc.
   
Basic lodging - some with shared bathroom facilities, usually no AC or room service.
Regular standard room - usually with private bath.
 Accommodations with superior comforts.
   
 = Trips with nights in tent camps. Sometimes the first and last night are in hotels.
   
Basic tent camping - everyone helps out with camp chores.
Regular standard with some camp amenities and camp cook.
Camping facilities with superior comforts like camp shower, bathroom facility..
   
 = Trips that combine nights in hotels and camping.
   
Basic accommodation and basic camping facilities can be expected.
Regular standard with some nicer amenities.
Only assigned to hotel and camping facilities with superior comforts.

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Tack: Western
Horses: Quarter Mix
Pace: Slow, 4 to 6 hrs per day. All of our r...
Walk,
Airport: Calgary International Airport (YYC)
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